QA

How Is QA Testing Done? QA – Before finishing a project or handing over a product, quality assurance is needed to ensure that what the customer or client is receiving is up to expectation and meets agreed quality standards. Arguably one of the most important aspects of the ensure process, the QA team is usually […]

How Is QA Testing Done?

QA – Before finishing a project or handing over a product, quality assurance is needed to
ensure that what the customer or client is receiving is up to expectation and meets
agreed quality standards.

Arguably one of the most important aspects of the ensure process, the QA team is
usually outsourced, but for some project, QA automation has become the norm, saving
time and money while adding more rigorous levels of testing as we go.

Why Do We Need QA Testing?

Bugs. They’re almost an inevitable part of any software or project, but they are annoying nonetheless, and serious bugs can have serious consequences for both customer and
the user.

While development teams will do different levels of QA engineer testing, a fragmented
approach can mean that more bugs slip through the net than would be acceptable.

Employing the help of professional QA technicians leads to more rigorous testing and more
bugs being sifted out before the product or service is launched. This means a faster turnaround time, reduced costs, and, when QA testing activities are incorporated earlier in the development process, the product development lifecycle will be a lot smoother.

How Quality Assurance testing is Done

In short, QA testing is vital for any product; a testing culture should be embedded into the development lifecycle of a project to ensure that products reach the end-user in a bug-free and usable way. This is better for the developers and much better for the commissioning client.

A QA team will work within their own remit and work to ensure all bugs are caught in plenty of time. Here’s a quick rundown of how most QA teams work and the steps they take to ensure quality.

Getting the Requirements Right

A quality assurance team will look through the brief of the project to understand the exact requirements that are needed. This allows the team to understand what kinds of bugs they may be looking for and which part of the requirement brief will be impacted by the bugs

The Planning Phase

Every project needs planning, and during this part of the phase, QA testers will plan out how the project tests will take palace and exactly what they should be looking for to ensure a thorough test.

Expectations

Teams should work within the parameters set, with prior knowledge of expected outcomes. This is particularly important with a product is not in a ‘finished’ or at least a beta state. Testing

Finally, the testing is ready to commence, this should be done within the expected parameters listed in the step above, and any issues should be noted down with as much detail as required.

Retesting

Once the first set of tests have been completed and the first set of bugs ironed out, the process runs through as many times as necessary to ensure that all bugs are caught and fixed.

During the retesting phase, QA technicians will check to see that bug fixes haven’t caused new bugs; this is known as regression testing also on website development.

Preparing A Report

Once the testing has been completed to an agreed standard or level, a report should be developed and passed back to the engineers for action.